OVW Tribal Affairs Division New Grantee Orientation

The New Grantee Orientation (NGO) is designed to strengthen the grantee’s ability to successfully implement their grant projects, increase their understanding of project impact within their community, and support the ability of the tribal government and community to respond effectively towards domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, stalking and sex trafficking. Who should attend? Newly funded Tribal Governments Program grantees, Tribal Sexual Assault Services grantees, Tribal Jurisdiction grantees and new project directors and staff of programs previously funded under the above grant programs. Go to: https://www.tadngo.com/ for more information.

Using Experts for Investigation and Prosecution of Sexual Violence Cases: IAFN

Sexual violence cases often present evidentiary questions and issues that are not in easily understood without the assistance of someone with specialized knowledge, training, and/or experience. This can involve challenges to understanding the presence or absence of medical evidence, the impact of toxicology on the human body, as well as the effects of trauma and the range of individual responses to sexual violence. Experienced professionals can provide judges and juries with the necessary context to ensure that they are making informed decisions based on the evidence and prevent misconceptions from negatively impacting the outcome of a case. The presenter will summarize the law related to the introduction of expert testimony and highlight the importance of deciding if and when to introduce expert testimony in a case.

Creating and Sustaining TCU Campus Led Coordinated Community Response Teams: Red Wind Consulting

A campus response to sexual assault can include many campus staff working in different departments. Campus Security, Title IX investigators, Counselors, Cultural Centers, and faculty could be responding to students who have experienced sexual assault. It is critical that there is a clear and consistent response to ensure that students receive the support and services they need. In the first webinar in this series, presenters will define what a campus-led coordinated response team (CCR) is, who the key players are in a campus CCR, and how to develop plans, visions, protocols. The second part of this series will be a hands-on approach, including steps to developing a coordinated community response team and how to sustain one through time.

Engaging With Children Who Have Been Sexually Abused in the AN/AI Population: IAFN

This webinar features an overview of facts and statistics regarding children/youth who may have experienced sexual abuse: how the impact of the trauma can follow them through life, while discussing the efforts to help heal, lessening the impacts of the trauma; as well as strengthening their natural resiliency to help the child/youth move from victimization to survivor with a focus on Alaska Native/American Indian children/youth population.

Reclaiming Identity: The Power of Who We Think We Are

How do we reclaim our own stories and the story of our community? This presentation will focus on ways we can undo who we are not and the power of reclaiming who we really are. We as all people, especially Indigenous People, can have no higher thought than who we think we are and who our communities are. In this webinar, Christina Love, ANDVSA Senior Specialist, will share the importance of story and how we see ourselves and the communities that grow us, including the importance of strong roots and some of the liberating practices that she has learned from growing back into community. Presented by Christina Love, Alaska Network on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault.