Funding Opportunities & Announcements


AUGUST 20, 2019

Training Opportunity: The National Tribal Advocate Center’s Domestic Abuse Tribal Advocate Institute and Sexual Assault Tribal Advocate Institute 40-hour trainings:

Domestic Assault Tribal Advocate Institute (DATI)
September 30 – October 4, 2019
Colorado Springs, CO 80918

Registration fee: $650
Discounted rate for 2 or more 

40-hour training, includes two working lunches

DATI provides tribal advocates with a native-specific approach to providing advocacy for survivors of Domestic Violence. Advocates will incorporate a decolonized trauma-centered approach to advocacy that builds on tribal values and beliefs in providing advocacy. The training includes the dynamics of Domestic Violence and the role of the Advocate, Advocate confidentiality, domestic violence and its impact on children, Teen Dating Violence, dangerousness and managing safety, technology safety, VAWA protections, Coordinated Community Response and advocacy for battered women arrested.

Registration is OPEN – Click for More information and registration

Sexual Assault Tribal Advocate Institute (SATI)
October 28 – November 1, 2019
Colorado Springs, CO 80918 

Registration fee: $650
Discounted rate for 2 or more 

40-hour training, includes two working lunches

SATI provides training to build the critical framework for Tribal Sexual Assault Advocates to effectively and appropriately respond to sexual assault survivors in their communities. The training includes crisis intervention, understanding trauma and decolonizing trauma, cultural supports for long-term healing; informed consent, confidentiality and mandated reporting, challenging issues, working with the Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner, and working with the criminal justice response.

Registration is OPEN – Click for More information and registration

Check out the website for more information. You will find description, registration costs, agenda, and hotel information. If you have any questions, please email training@red-wind.net.


AUGUST 12, 2019

OVW requests nominations for new members for the Task Force on Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women

The Office on Violence Against Women of the U.S. Department of Justice requests recommendations for individuals to serve as members on a federal advisory committee, the Task Force on Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women (Task Force). Recommendations should consist of a cover letter recommending the individual and explaining the individual’s qualifications to serve on the Task Force, as well as a copy of the individual’s resume or curriculum vitae. Self-recommendations are not accepted. If you would like to make a membership recommendation for this federal advisory committee, please send your recommendation to the email address or contact person listed below.

Nominations may be submitted by email to OVW.taskforce@usdoj.gov or by mail to: Laura L. Rogers, Acting Director, Office on Violence Again Women, U.S. Department of Justice, 145 N Street NE, Washington, DC 20530 by September 13, 2019.

For more information go to the Federal Register.


AUGUST 2, 2019

Only two weeks left to apply for the Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime FY 2019 Tribal Victims Services Set-Aside (VSSA) Solicitation

Through the FY 2019 Tribal Victim Services Set-Aside solicitation, OVC seeks to provide support to tribal communities to improve services for victims of crime. This program will support a comprehensive range of activities including needs assessment, strategic planning, program development and implementation, and other activities needed to address the needs of a wide variety of crime victims in tribal communities.

 

Apply under one of the following purpose areas:

 

  • Purpose Area 1: Establishment of a New Victim Service Program Applicants that have no existing victim services program, including applicants that do not have programs and are going to coordinate with others to provide services to them. 
  • Purpose Area 2: Coordination and Expansion of Existing Victim Service Program The goal under this purpose area is for existing victim service programs to expand and enhance their services so that they can become more victim-centered, culturally competent, and provide more services, better services, serve more victims, and provide services to crime victims for whom there were no services available previously.

Apply Here

 ***Applications are due 11:59 p.m. EST, Aug. 16, 2019.


JULY 23, 2019

Impact Justice, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice, announces the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Targeted Implementation Planning and Support program application period is now open through 11:59 p.m. EST, Aug. 30, 2019.

PREA TIPS is a new opportunity from Impact Justice, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, to provide federal funding* in the amount of $20,000$200,000 to assist in PREA implementation. This opportunity is open to small and medium locally operated jails, juvenile facilities, community confinement facilities, lockups, and tribal facilities with fewer than 500 beds, with a preference for facilities with fewer than 200 beds. Agencies and facilities are also welcome to submit joint applications.

Agencies and facilities will receive strategic guidance from subject matter experts at Impact Justice, the PREA Resource Center, Vera Institute of Justice, and the Center for Children’s Law and Policy during a planning phase before entering into an up to 18-month phase to implement their plan. Each successful applicant will be assigned a PREA expert to work with throughout the program period.

How to Apply: All potential applicants should review the PREA TIPS Request for Proposals (RFP) prior to beginning their application. The RFP will explain in detail the application and program requirements.

The application is available online. The application platform requires users to create a username and password. Applicants should allow themselves enough time to ensure they can access the application.

In the application, be able to describe where you are in the process of PREA implementation, create a simple budget, and have the support of your facility or agency leadership. This funding also requires match funding, either cash or in-kind, from awardees as a sign of the institution’s commitment to change. 

Impact Justice will host an informational webinar on July 30, 2019 at 2:00 pm EST to assist with the application process. Register for the webinar here.

The online application, RFP, and webinar registration can be found on the PREA TIPS page. A recording of the informational webinar will also be published on the page after July 30.


JULY 22, 2019

OVW’s Fiscal Year 2019 Alaska Full Faith and Credit Training and Technical Assistance Initiative Call for Concepts Papers Now Open

On June 28, 2019, Attorney General William P. Barr declared a law enforcement emergency in rural Alaska. He directed DOJ to deploy additional resources to respond to this emergency. Alaska is home to some of the most remote communities in all of America, including 229 federally recognized tribes. This geographic isolation contributes to law enforcement problems not seen anywhere else in our nation. The lack of law enforcement resources results in a high violent crime rate, especially in Alaska Native communities. In response to the emergency declaration,

OVW will award one grant for $275,000 through its Alaska Full Faith and Credit Training and Technical Assistance Initiative for training and technical assistance for state and local law enforcement, prosecutors and other government attorneys, and court personnel on enforcement of tribal protection orders. In addition, the grantee will provide training and technical assistance for tribal courts and communities on issuance and enforcement of protection orders.

About the OVW Alaska Full Faith and Credit Training and Technical Assistance Initiative: Included in VAWA legislation is the full faith and credit provision (18 U.S.C. § 2265), which provides that states, tribes, and territories (the enforcing jurisdictions) must enforce a qualifying protection order from outside the enforcing jurisdiction as if the protection order had been issued by the enforcing jurisdiction. The enforcing jurisdiction cannot require registration of the order, or notification of such registration to a respondent, as a prerequisite for enforcement.

During OVW’s Annual Tribal Consultations, many tribes, including Alaska tribes, have expressed concern about a lack of state enforcement of tribal protection orders. The purpose of this initiative is to improve enforcement of tribal protection orders and thereby enhance the safety of victims in Alaska Native villages by providing technical assistance and training to tribes, state and loc al law enforcement, prosecutors, and government attorneys, and courts.

Applications are due by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time (E.T.) on September 2, 2019.

View the Solicitation


JULY 10, 2019

Webinar: Tribal Consultation on Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) 2013, Section 903

July 17, 2019 from 12:00 – 1:30pm MST
(10am Alaska / 11am PST / 12pm MST / 1pm CST / 2pm EST)

Webinar Description: VAWA 2005 requires DOJ, HHS, and DOI to consult with Indian tribes on an annual basis. This interaction on a nation-to-nation basis has allowed tribal governments and the United States to discuss matters that at the broadest level impact the safety of Indian women, and to propose strategies to address these issues. Join this webinar to review outstanding or emerging issues to address the most serious roadblocks to the safety of Native women and how you can voice your concerns and provide recommendations to increase accountability and enhance the safety for Native women.

Presenters: Michelle Demmert, NCAI Violence Against Women Task Force, Co-Chair; Juana Majel Dixon, NCAI Violence Against Women Task Force, Co-Chair; Kelbie Kennedy, Policy Counsel, NCAI; and Elizabeth Carr, Senior Native Affairs Advisor, NIWRC.

Register for the Webinar

14th Annual Government-to-Government Violence Against Women Tribal Consultation
When: August 21-22, 2019
Where: Silver Creek Event Center at Four Winds Casino Resort, New Buffalo, Michigan

For more information go to: https://www.justice.gov/ovw/tribal-consultation. Logistical information is available at: http://ovwconsultation.org.


JULY 8, 2019

Vera Institute of Justice Requests Applications for technical assistance to improve access to victim services and justice options for survivors of sexual violence with disabilities.

With support from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), the Vera Institute of Justice’s Center on Victimization and Safety (Vera), a national non-profit organization working to end abuse of people with disabilities, is soliciting letters of interest from local communities to participate in a pilot project to improve access to healing services and justice options for survivors of sexual violence who have disabilities.

Vera will work with the selected applicants to bring together key stakeholders in their community, which must include a local rape crisis center and disability service provider, with the goal of improving responses to survivors of sexual assault with disabilities; identifying gaps and barriers to healing services and justice options for survivors with disabilities; and creating better pathways to healing for these survivors.

The Vera Institute will select two communities to participate in this pilot project. To apply, perspective communities must submit a brief application letter and letters of support.

Over a 9-month period, we will provide tailored support and training in the form on consultations, in person meetings, and virtual convenings to the selected communities to support their efforts to identify needs and close service gaps for survivors with disabilities. We will also work with local partners to devise a funding strategy to sustain the work and vision of their learning community once the 9-month project period ends.

Learn More & Apply

Organizations that are currently receiving federal funds through the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women’s Training and Enhanced Services to End Violence Against Women with Disabilities Grant Program are not eligible to apply for this project.


JUNE 25, 2019

Application Deadline Extended for the FY 2019 Tribal Victims Services Set-Aside (VSSA) Solicitation

 

The Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime has extended the application deadline for the FY 2019 Tribal Victims Services Set-Aside (VSSA) Solicitation to 11:59 p.m. EST, Aug. 16, 2019.

 

Additionally, multiple other updates have recently been made to this solicitation and can be read in summary at https://www.ovc.gov/grants/pdftxt/FY19-VSSA-Solicitation-Update.pdf.

 

Through the FY 2019 Tribal Victim Services Set-Aside Program solicitation, OVC seeks to provide support to tribal communities to improve services for victims of crime. This program will support a comprehensive range of activities including needs assessment, strategic planning, program development and implementation, and other activities needed to address the needs of a wide variety of crime victims in tribal communities.

 

 Apply under one of the following purpose areas:

  •  Purpose Area 1: Establishment of a New Victim Service Program: Applicants that have no existing victim services program, including applicants that do not have programs and are going to coordinate with others to provide services to them.  
  • Purpose Area 2: Coordination and Expansion of Existing Victim Service Program: The goal under this purpose area is for existing victim service programs to expand and enhance their services so that they can become more victim-centered, culturally competent, and provide more services, better services, serve more victims, and provide services to crime victims for whom there were no services available previously.

OVC will conduct a pre-application webinar to review the solicitation requirements and conduct a question and answer session. The webinar will be held this Thursday, June 27, 2019, from 1-2 p.m. EST.

Register now at: https://go.usa.gov/xmsFH

 

Applications are due Aug. 16, 2019. Apply at: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=316491


JUNE 21, 2019

National AMBER Alert in Indian Country Symposium

Focus of Training: The AMBER Alert symposium is designed to bring together tribal leaders, public safety and emergency management personnel, and state AMBER Alert coordinators and federal officials, to focus on the implementation of the Ashlynne Mike AMBER Alert in Indian Country Act of 2018. The AMBER Alert Training and Technical Assistance Program is able to offer a limited number of scholarships to assist with lodging and travel for this event. All scholarships will be reviewed and final decision will rest with the Program Administrator. The application deadline is June 14th, 2019. If scholarship assistance is needed, please apply for it during your registration process.

During the symposium, you will:

  • Learn about the Ashlynne Mike AMBER Alert in Indian Country Act of 2018
  • Discuss methods for improving the process of integration between state or regional AMBER Alert communication plans with federally recognized tribes from across the nation
  • Examine current resources, tools, and technologies to enhance the AMBER Alert network within Indian Country
  • Increase collaboration with OJJDP, NCMEC, AATTAP, state AMBER Alert coordinators and other federal and state officials 

Cost: NO FEE | When: July 30 – August 1, 2019

Where: Isleta Resort and Casino, 11000 Broadway SE, Albuquerque, NM 87105 ***Note: *When making reservations, individuals must identify themselves as attending the National AMBER Alert in Indian Country Symposium in order to receive the group rate.

Who: Can benefit from this training?

  • Emergency Management
  • Law Enforcement
  • Tribes/Tribal Partners 

Registration: Details on lodging and registration are available here.


JUNE 21, 2019

AMBER Alert Training for BIA Tribal Law Enforcement

 Focus of Training: During the training, you will learn best practices for responding to a missing or abducted children report, which will improve the probability of a quick recovery and lay the groundwork to support the investigation. You will also gather important procedures for investigative case management, conducting search and canvass operations, and victim support services. Particular attention will be made to the available resources and tools available to assist in the investigation.

Upon completion of this training, you will be able to:

  • Gain an understanding of the AMBER Alert program
  • Effectively plan and respond to missing and abduction cases in Native communities.
  • Conduct effective investigative and case management

Cost: NO FEE

When and Where:

July 23-24, 2019: United Tribes Technical College, 3315 University Drive Building 9A, Bismarck, ND 58504

August 12-13, 2019: Fort McDowell Enterprise Training Facility, 18580 E Toh-Vee Circle, Fort McDowell, AZ 85264

Who: Can benefit from this training?

  • Court System Personnel
  • Law Enforcement
  • Prosecutors
  • Tribes/Tribal Partners 

Registration: July 23-24, 2019 training: Register at https://www.fvtc.edu/apps/mytraining/Public/AddedToCart.aspx?1=71202.

August 12-13, 2019:  Register at: https://www.fvtc.edu/apps/mytraining/Public/AddedToCart.aspx?1=83877


JUNE 7, 2019

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention will host the following three online learning events in June:

Webinar #1: Developing Trauma Informed Juvenile Healing to Wellness Courts

WHEN: Thursday, June 13, 2 p.m. ET; 1 p.m. CT; Noon MT; 11 a.m. PT  

This presentation will focus on the importance of a trauma informed approach in juvenile justice systems. Presenters will discuss why trauma informed practices are needed and what it means to be trauma informed. Content will cover ways to recognize and respond to trauma in the courtroom and strategies for implementing a trauma-informed approach. The presenters will provide considerations for assessing and referring a youth who has experienced trauma.

After this presentation, participants will: 

  1. Understand the importance of a trauma informed approach in juvenile justice healing to wellness courts
  2. Be able to better identify the presence of trauma in an individual appearing in the justice setting
  3. Learn ways to respond to an individual who may be having a traumatic reaction in the court room
  4. Understand some of the strategies healing to wellness courts can employ when implementing a trauma informed approach
  5. Understand the difference between trauma informed assessments and those that do not specifically assess for trauma along with information regarding trauma responsive referral sources

Facilitator: Ashley Trautman, MSW, JD; MSW Program Director/Assistant Professor University of Montana School of Social Work, Juvenile Justice Technical Assistance Specialist National Native Children’s Trauma Center

Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4625419317646483725


Webinar #2: Introduction to Childhood Exposure to Trauma in Tribal Communities

WHEN: Thursday, June 20; 2 p.m. ET; 1 p.m. CT; Noon MT; 11 a.m. PT  

The Online Learning Event will focus on describing child traumatic stress as a result of children’s exposure to one or more traumatic events including traumatic loss (grief) and as a result have developed reactions that impact their daily lives. Children or adolescents may react in a variety of ways, such as intense emotional distress and difficulty in self-regulation, behavior changes, problems developing and maintaining relationships, attention and academic difficulties, difficulty sleeping and eating. Older children may use drugs or alcohol and engage in other risky behaviors. These reactions are understood as traumatic stress.  Children and youth who have traumatic stress reactions are at increased risk of involvement in the juvenile justice system.

Professionals working in child serving systems like juvenile justice can have a positive impact for children, adolescents and their families by developing universal strategies and trauma-informed practices.  

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize behaviors in children and youth that may be the result of exposure to traumatic events or grief/loss;
  2. Begin to utilize and apply universal strategies to support children and youth in their professional settings;
  3. Acquire the foundational knowledge to plan and begin to create trauma-informed practices in their agencies/programs

Facilitator: Marilyn J. Bruguier Zimmerman, MSW, PhD, (Nakota/Dakota/Ojibwe/Newe)

Senior Director of Policy and Programs, National Native Children’s Trauma Center Diversity and Inclusion Coordinator, 2 + 2 Program School of Social Work University of Montana

Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6231791512066880525


Webinar #3: Secondary Traumatic Stress in Juvenile to Healing Wellness Courts, Schools, and Tribal Program Settings

 WHEN: Thursday, June 27; 2 p.m. ET; 1 p.m. CT; Noon MT; 11 a.m. PT

This presentation will discuss the importance of understanding, identifying and responding to the experience of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) which we define as the emotional impact of working with those who have experienced trauma. Content will include an overview of the difference between primary and secondary trauma and describe a three-stage process for coping with STS. Specifically, presenters will discuss the importance of gaining knowledge about STS, how to recognize it in ourselves and ways to respond. The presentation will conclude by offering a framework for self-care through awareness, balance and connection.

Learning objectives. At the end of this presentation, participants will understand:

  1. The importance of addressing Secondary Traumatic Stress;
  2. Differences between primary trauma and secondary Trauma; and
  3. The three stages in the process of coping with Secondary Traumatic Stress Self-care ABCs                                                                                                                        

Facilitator: Laura Guay, MSW ; Training and Technical Assistance, Mental Health Specialist

National Native Children’s Trauma Center, University of Montana

Register at: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1036087798027703821


JUNE 4, 2019

OVC Funding Available: Services for Urban American Indian and Alaska Native Victims of Sex Trafficking

OVC FY 2019 Project Beacon: Increasing Services for Urban American Indian and Alaska Native Victims of Sex Trafficking

OVC will make awards to increase the quantity and quality of services currently available to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) victims of sex trafficking who reside in urban areas. Apply under one of the following purpose areas (PAs).

PA 1: Direct Services: Applicants may request funding to: develop or enhance their organizational capacity to provide services to urban AI/AN victims of sex trafficking; develop and sustain collaborative partnerships; conduct community outreach and awareness activities; and provide training to other stakeholders on how to meet the needs of urban AI/AN victims of sex trafficking.

PA 2: Training and Technical Assistance (TTA): Applicants may request funding to provide capacity-building TTA to successful grantees under Purpose Area 1.

View the Solicitation

Apply by July 15, 2019.

OVC will conduct a pre-application webinar on June 19, 2019, at 1:00 p.m. ET. Register at www.ovc.gov/grants/webinars.html.


MAY 28, 2019

Office of Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Grant Opportunity: FY2019 Specialized Services and Mentoring for Child and Youth Victims of Sex Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation

The purpose of the program is to support the efforts of organizations to develop or enhance their mentoring capacity, facilitate outreach efforts, and increase the availability of direct services for child and youth victims of commercial sexual exploitation and domestic sex trafficking. Under this initiative, experienced organizations work with OJJDP’s existing training and technical assistance provider to develop or enhance mentoring service models and mentor training based on best practices to focus on the needs of girls and boys, who are at risk or are victims of commercial sexual exploitation and domestic sex trafficking.

View the Grant Opportunity

Application Deadline: July 29, 2019


MAY 13, 2019

DOJ Training – Federal Criminal Practice for Tribal Prosecutors Seminar: July 30 – August 2, 2019

The National Indian Country Training Initiative, together with the Bureau of Justice Assistance, is pleased to announce they are co-sponsoring the Federal Criminal Practice for Tribal Prosecutors Seminar. The seminar is July 30 – August 2, 2019, at the National Advocacy Center in Columbia, South Carolina. Lodging and travel accommodations will be provided by the Department of Justice’s Office of Legal Education.

This seminar, a partnership between the National Indian Country Training Initiative and the Bureau of Justice Assistance, is intended for law-trained and licensed tribal prosecutors and tribal attorneys interested in serving or already serving as a Special Assistant United States Attorney (SAUSA) in a United States Attorney’s office.

The training will cover the fundamentals of criminal federal practice, including the rules of federal criminal procedure, complaint drafting, indictments, search warrants, magistrate court practice, the elements of commonly charged offenses, and the principles of federal prosecution.

This training will also present an in-depth look at grand jury procedure, including mechanics, secrecy, strategy, acquisition of evidence, privileges, immunity, dealing with hostile/recalcitrant witnesses, multiple representation, conflicts of interest, and ethical issues. In addition, this seminar will cover e-discovery and the calculation and use of sentencing guidelines.

Please complete and submit the nomination form at the following link for each of your nominees:

https://survey.ole.justice.gov/snapwebhost/s.asp?k=155776775863

Nomination forms are due by May 24, 2019. If you are providing more than one nomination form for your office, please rank each nomination in the order of preference. You will see a space for providing the order of preference for attendance on the application form.

The NICTI will review all nominations and the NICTI will send an e-mail advising nominees of their selection on or about June 3, 2019. Selected nominees will also receive information on how to book travel and lodging.

In order to ensure that our records are correct, please type in the required information when completing the nomination forms. Illegible and/or incomplete forms will not be considered.

Due to the increasing number of last minute cancellations, we must ask that only nominations for those who are certain to attend be submitted.


MAY 6, 2019

Now Available: 2018 OVW ANNUAL TRIBAL CONSULTATION REPORT & COVER LETTER

The 2018 Government-to-Government Violence Against Women Tribal Consultation Report, which summarizes the recommendations that OVW received from tribal leaders at last year’s Consultation, is now available.

View the Report and Cover Letter sent to tribal leaders who attended the 2018 Consultation.


APRIL 24, 2019

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Report “Broken Promises: Continuing Federal Funding Shortfall for Native Americans”

On December 20, 2018, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights released its report, Broken Promises: Continuing Federal Funding Shortfall for Native Americans (www.usccr.gov/pubs/2018/12-20-Broken-Promises.pdf). The report revisits the Commission’s 2003 report, A Quiet Crisis: Federal Funding and Unmet Needs in Indian Country (www.usccr.gov/pubs/na0703/na0204.pdf), which evaluated expenditures of federal agencies on Native American programs.

The Broken Promises report is based on expert and public input, including from NCAI, and extensive research and analysis. The report found that funding for services critical to Native Americans was disproportionately lower than that for other populations.

Key findings from the report include:

  • Federal programs designed to support the social and economic well-being of Native Americans remain underfunded and sometimes inefficiently structured.
  • Unequal treatment of tribal governments and lack of full recognition of their sovereign status by state and federal governments, laws, and policies diminish tribal self-determination and negatively impact health, criminal justice, education, housing, and economic outcomes.
  • The federal government has failed to keep accurate, consistent, and comprehensive records of federal spending on Native American programs, making monitoring of federal spending to meet its trust responsibility difficult.

The report also offers recommendations to the President, Congress, and numerous federal agencies on how to honor trust obligations to tribal nations.


APRIL 11, 2019

SANE Expert Witness Training July 9-11, 2019: National Advocacy Center, Columbia, NC

The U.S. Department of Justice’s National Indian Country Training Initiative, in partnership with the International Association of Forensic Nurses, is pleased to announce the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners’ Expert Witness Training. The seminar will be held July 9-11, 2019, at the National Advocacy Center in Columbia, South Carolina. Travel related expenses will be covered by the U.S. Department of Justice. There is no tuition charge for this training.

Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs) are specialists in one of the most well-known fields within the field of forensic nursing. Many prosecutors are comfortable using forensic nurses to testify to the facts of a case. However, forensic nurses are often overlooked as accessible expert witnesses. Prosecutors can use forensic nursing expert testimony to educate the jury on the characteristics of battered individuals (to include minimizing and recanting, mechanisms of injury and wounds) and to inform the jury why there may be an absence of injury. Forensic nurses can also assist prosecutors by reviewing medical records prior to trial and identifying relevant portions of the documentation.

This training is designed for SANEs interested in providing expert testimony and for prosecutors assigned to sexual assault and domestic violence cases who want to learn more about the effective use of a SANE as an expert witness in their cases. Priority consideration will go to SANEs and prosecutors working on cases arising in Indian Country.

This class has a mock trial component, and prosecutors and a SANE(s) who work cases together are encouraged to register as a team.

Please complete and submit the nomination form at the following link for each of your nominees: https://survey.ole.justice.gov/snapwebhost/s.asp?k=155421728776

Nomination forms are due by May 3, 2019.

The NICTI will review all nominations and the NICTI will send an e-mail advising nominees of their selection on or about May 13, 2019. Selected nominees will also receive information on how to book travel and lodging.

In order to ensure that our records are correct, please type in the required information when completing the nomination forms. Illegible and/or incomplete forms will not be considered.

Due to the increasing number of last-minute cancellations, we must ask that only nominations for those who are certain to attend be submitted.

The Executive Office for United States Attorneys will provide reasonable accommodations to people with disabilities. Requests should be made to Delores Johnson as early as possible, preferably at least two weeks in advance of the seminar. No nominee will be excluded from a course on the basis of a disability-related accommodations request.

This training is authorized under the Government Employees Training Act. 

Any questions regarding this training seminar should be directed to Delores McCarter Johnson at (803) 705-5123 or Leslie A. Hagen at Leslie.Hagen3@usdoj.gov.


MARCH 6, 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

StrongHearts Native Helpline Expands Operating Hours In Order To Better Serve Native Americans Impacted By Domestic Violence
Native-centered helpline increases operating hours in response to need for culturally-based support for victims of violence in Indian Country and Alaska.

Media Contact:
Mallory Black
512-766-7947
media@strongheartshelpline.org

EAGAN, Minnesota (March 6, 2019)— On its second year anniversary, the StrongHearts Native Helpline (1-844-7NATIVE) is announcing the expansion of its hours of operation, which are now 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. CST, 7 days a week, in order to better serve those impacted by domestic violence and dating violence in tribal communities across the U.S. Callers reaching out after hours may connect with the National Domestic Violence Hotline (1-800-799-SAFE) by selecting option 1. To date, the helpline has received more than 2,100 calls from victims, survivors, concerned family members and friends, service providers and more, helping to close a gap in culturally-appropriate resources for those facing abuse.

With the support from the National Domestic Violence Hotline, the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, and the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program, StrongHearts has established its first call center located in Eagan, Minnesota. With the expansion in services, StrongHearts has increased its staff of advocates in order to respond to callers, many of whom are seeking support as they navigate difficult barriers to justice and safety. Trained with a strong understanding of tribal cultures, sovereignty and law, advocates offer free, peer-to-peer support and a connection to local, culturally appropriate resources.

“After hearing from so many tribes and advocates about their community needs, we are so pleased to expand our operating hours to better serve Native victims of relationship abuse,” said StrongHearts Assistant Director Lori Jump (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians). “Domestic violence impacts our relatives every hour of every day, so it’s critical for us to be available as much as possible. Yet, we also understand we can’t do this work alone. We are honored to be working alongside tribal advocates and programs doing this good work to help Native people seek lives that are free of abuse.”

Domestic violence remains a severe issue in tribal communities, where half of Native American women and a third of Native men have experienced physical abuse by an intimate partner in their lifetime, according to a study by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The study also found for those who had experienced violence, more than a third of Native women and more than one in six Native men were unable to access the services they needed, such as shelters, legal advocacy and medical services.

“When victims can’t access services, more specifically, services that understand their unique worldview and culture, it leaves little room for healing and restoration,” Jump said. “Our people are strong and resilient, but it is crucial that we create spaces where survivors of violence feel safe and empowered to make the best decisions for themselves and their families along their healing journey, wherever it leads. We are here for our relatives. No one should have to face violence alone.”

About the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center
The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, Inc. (NIWRC) is a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to restoring the sovereignty of Native nations and safeguarding Native women and their children. The NIWRC supports culturally grounded, grassroots advocacy and provides national leadership to ending gender-based violence in indigenous communities through the development of educational materials and programs, direct technical assistance and the development of local and national policy that builds the capacity of Indigenous communities and strengthens the exercise of tribal sovereignty. www.niwrc.org

About the StrongHearts Native Helpline
Created by and for American Indians and Alaska Natives across the United States, the StrongHearts Native Helpline (1-844-7NATIVE), a project of the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, the National Domestic Violence Hotline, and the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program, is a culturally-appropriate, confidential and anonymous service dedicated to serving Native Americans affected by domestic violence and dating violence. By dialing 1-844-762-8483, anytime from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. CST, 7 days a week, callers can connect for free, one-on-one, with knowledgeable StrongHearts advocates who can provide peer-to-peer support and referrals to resources to help callers find safety and healing. Callers reaching out after hours may connect with the National Domestic Violence Hotline (1-800-799-SAFE) by selecting option 1. Learn more about the StrongHearts Native Helpline at www.strongheartshelpline.org.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Jan. 4, 2018 

Muscogee (Creek) Nation Convicts First Non-Native Offender Through Violence Against Women Act Implementations

OKMULGEE, Okla. – As a Violence Against Women Act implementation, the Muscogee (Creek) Nation convicted its first non-Indian offender by exercising the sovereign power to prosecute domestic violence crimes and protective order violations committed against Natives in Indian Country.

The VAWA Reauthorization 2013 provisions allow the Nation to use its “Special Domestic Violence Criminal Jurisdiction” authority to prosecute domestic violence, dating violence and protective order violations as long as all statutory requirements have been met.

“This conviction shows that we are serious about Indian domestic violence and we will investigate these claims and take action to the fullest extent of the law to eliminate the domestic violence among our people,” Principal Chief James R. Floyd said. “We want to make it known that we do not condone these actions and there are consequences.”

The Nation is one of only 23 tribes in the country exercising SDVCJ, which stipulations require the case involve a defendant who committed the crime in Indian Country and had sufficient ties to the Native victim, as defined in Section 1304 of VAWA Reauthorization 2013.

On Nov. 4, 2018, MCN Lighthorse Police Department arrested Antonio Martinez-Juarez for violating a protective order and committing domestic violence against a tribal member on trust land.

“Thanks to the prompt response by Lighthorse Officer Troy Dodd and Sargent Leroy Arnold, as well as their knowledge of the Nation’s VAWA provisions, the Nation’s Attorney General’s Office had the evidence necessary to file charges against Martinez-Juarez for his violent actions,” MCN Prosecutor Shelly Harrison said.

Martinez-Juarez was booked into the Okmulgee County Jail where he remains on a hold for a detainer placed by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement for immigration status.

During his Dec. 18 court hearing, Martinez-Juarez was convicted of Count 1: Domestic Abuse in the Presence of a Child; and Count 2: Violation of a Protective Order.

He was subsequently sentenced on Count 1 to one year in the custody of Lighthorse with time suspended except 90 days with credit for time served; and ordered to pay a $1,000 fine. For Count 2, he received a $300 fine and a one-year sentence in Lighthorse custody with time suspended provided he remains in compliance with the rules and conditions of supervised probation.

Additionally, Martinez-Juarez was ordered to complete and follow all recommendations of a domestic violence assessment and substance abuse evaluation, as well as pay all associated court costs.

“We are confident that Judge Greg Bigler’s sentence sends a clear message that the Nation takes domestic violence seriously and that we will take the necessary steps to protect our citizens,” Prosecutor Harrison said.

In an effort to strengthen the justice system in sexual assault and domestic violence crimes, VAWA was first passed by Congress in 1994 for communities to increase victim support and services and impose tougher penalties on offenders.

Since the beginning of VAWA, there has been reauthorizations in 2000, 2005 and 2013, with the 2013 provisions being the most impactful for tribes as it removed the jurisdictional gap that hindered the domestic violence protections available to Native women.

The latest reauthorization stemmed from July 2011 when the U.S. Department of Justice holding extensive meetings with tribal leaders and presenting a legislative proposal to Congress that addressed alarming statistics of unprosecuted and unpunished cases of domestic violence against Native women.

The DOJ National Institute of Justice reported American Indian and Alaska Native women are five times as likely as non-Hispanic Caucasian women to experience physical violence by an inter-racial intimate partner.

According to the NIJ, “more than half (55 percent) of American Indian and Alaska Native women have experienced physical violence by an intimate partner in their lifetimes – and 90 percent of these victims report being victimized by a non-Indian perpetrator, while only 18 percent report being victimized by an Indian.”

As a result of the 2013 reauthorization, the Nation began exercising SDVCJ March 28, 2016 with efforts from Lighthorse law enforcement, tribal court prosecution and an extensive victim support outreach, the MCN Family Violence and Prevention Program.

The FVPP services include offering victims with assistance filing protective orders, emergency shelter, safety planning, Sexual Assault Nurse Exams among other advocacy efforts.

Additional information on the FVPP services can be found on the Nation’s website at: www.mcn-nsn.gov/services/family-violence-prevention-program/.

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OCTOBER 22, 2018

OVW FAQ on Tribal Consultation by States for STOP Violence Against Women

The statute governing the STOP Violence Against Women Grant Program (STOP Program) (34 U.S.C. 10446(c)(2)) requires that states develop a plan for implementation of STOP Program funding and “consult and coordinate” with a list of different entities. Subparagraph (F) specifically provides that such entities include “[t]ribal governments in those States with State or federally recognized Indian tribes.” Id. at 10446(c)(2(F).

The OVW Tribal Affairs Division is working together with the OVW STOP Grant Program to bring together our Tribal and State Coalitions as part of the process to collaborate and assist with strengthening and making improvements to achieve the goal of meaningful consultation in this regard.

The OVW FAQ on Tribal Consultation by States for STOP Violence Against Women is intended to assist States in their effort to meaningfully consult with Tribes, as outlined in the STOP Violence Against Women Grant Program Implementation Planning under 34 U.S.C. 10446(c)(2)(F).

View the OVW FAQ on Tribal Consultation by States for STOP Violence Against Women.


Department of Justice, U.S. Attorney’s Office

District of New Mexico

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

OCTOBER 12, 2017

Non-Indian Man Pleads Guilty to Sexually Abusing Navajo Woman – Defendant Prosecuted as Part of Federal Initiative to Address the Epidemic Incidence of Violence Against Native Women

ALBUQUERQUE – Mark Silva, 48, of Sundance, N.M., pled guilty this morning in federal court in Albuquerque, N.M., to a sexual abuse charge.  Under the terms of his plea agreement, Silva will be sentenced to 60 months of imprisonment followed by a term of supervised release to be determined by the court.  Silva will also be required to register as a sex offender.

Silva was arrested on April 4, 2017, on an indictment charging him with sexual abuse on May 1, 2016, on the Navajo Indian Reservation in McKinley County, N.M.

During today’s proceedings, Silva pled guilty to the indictment and admitted that on May 1, 2016, he sexually abused a Navajo woman.  Silva further admitted that he engaged in the sexual act while knowing that the victim was incapable of declining participation in or communicating unwillingness to engage in the sexual act.  Silva remains in custody pending a sentencing hearing, which has yet to be scheduled.

This case was investigated by the Gallup office of the FBI.  The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph M. Spindle pursuant to the Tribal Special Assistant U.S. Attorney (Tribal SAUSA) Pilot Project in the District of New Mexico which is sponsored by the Justice Department’s Office on Violence Against Women under a grant administered by the Pueblo of Laguna.  The Tribal SAUSA Pilot Project seeks to train tribal prosecutors in federal law, procedure and investigative techniques to increase the likelihood that every viable violent offense against Native women is prosecuted in either federal court or tribal court, or both.  The Tribal SAUSA Pilot Project was largely driven by input gathered from annual tribal consultations on violence against women, and is another step in the Justice Department’s on-going efforts to increase engagement, coordination and action on public safety in tribal communities.

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AUGUST 16, 2017

Department of Justice Announces Additional Expansion of Program to Enhance Tribal Access to National Crime Information Databases.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) is continuing to expand the Tribal Access Program (TAP) for National Crime Information in FY18; TAP provides federally-recognized tribes access to national crime information databases for both civil and criminal purposes. TAP is currently primarily funded by the Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking (SMART) and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS). As such, TAP is currently prioritizing deployments to tribes that:

  • Have a Tribal sex offender registry pursuant to the Adam Walsh Act and are currently unable to directly submit data to national crime information databases; and/or
  • Have a Tribal law enforcement agency (not BIA direct service), that will use TAP to access the National Criminal Information Center (NCIC), Next Generation Identification (NGI), and other national databases to both view (query) and enter information.

TAP supports the selected tribes in analyzing their needs for national crime information and provides access, technology and training.

To learn more, go to:  WWW.JUSTICE.GOV/TRIBAL/TAP


MAY 30, 2017

Bureau of Justice Statistics | Office of Justice Programs | U.S. Department of Justice:

Police Response to Domestic Violence, 2006-2015 (NCJ 250231) is now available on BJS.gov. This report presents 2006-15 data on:

  • Nonfatal domestic violence victimizations reported to police
  • Police response to these victimizations
  • Prevalence of related arrests or charges
  • Criminal complaints signed against the offender.

Domestic violence includes serious violence (rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault) and simple assaults committed by intimate partners (spouse, former spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend), immediate family members (parent, child, or sibling), or other relatives. Data are from the National Crime Victimization Survey, which obtained victims’ descriptions of police actions during their initial response to a reported crime and any follow-up contact with the victim.

Download the Full Report

Download the Summary


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MSH-TA is supported by Grant No. 2015-TA-AX-K028, awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in the publications/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

 

 
 

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