Mending the Sacred Hoop TA Project

Training & Technical Assistance for OVW Tribal Grantees

Welcome to Mending the Sacred Hoop Technical Assistance Project (MSH-TA). MSH-TA serves as the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Provider for the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women Tribal Governments Program Grantees (Tribal Grantees).

We work with tribes and Native communities, villages, reservations, rancherias and pueblos across the United States to improve the justice system, law enforcement, and service provider response to the issues of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking in Native communities.

Our mission is to restore safety and integrity to Native women by assisting Native sovereign nations in strengthening their response to violence against American Indian / Alaska Native women. We work to improve the safety of Native women who experience battering, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking by assisting Tribal grantees with training, technical assistance and resource materials that specifically address violence against American Indian/Alaska Native women.

 
 

Trainings

Check back regularly for the latest in workshops and trainings that are offered!

4th Annual Tribal Governments Program National Summit Omaha, NE September 25-27, 2019 More Information»
 
 

TA and Training for OVW Tribal Programs Grantees

Technical Assistance to OVW Tribal Grantees

We provide on-site technical assistance* to OVW Tribal Program grantees on programming, prevention, engaging men and youth, Native women’s leadership and other areas specific to addressing violence against women. We also offer technical assistance through phone consultation, our website, and referrals, including referrals to other TA providers, MSH-TA training faculty or other grantees working on similar issues.

Mending the Sacred Hoop TA Project Trainings & Consultations

Training & Workshops – MSH-TA is dedicated to the safety and sovereignty of Native women, assisting Native communities in the development and enhancement of culturally-specific responses to violence against women based on each community’s unique circumstances. We provide culturally relevant training and workshops addressing violence against Native women to Office on Violence Against Women Tribal Program grantees on:

We also offer training and consultation on facilitating education groups and grassroots organizing on issues that affect the safety & sovereignty of Native women.

*Consultations – MSH-TA offers on-site consultations for planning and program development. These may include one to three days of evaluation and assessment of services such as shelter, advocacy, batterers’ re-education, developing a coordinated community response, law enforcement, developing tribal visitation centers, and other related programs.

Training and workshops are customized to your community’s needs and resources.

Call us toll-free at 888-305-1650, menu option 1.

 
 

Partners

Battered Women’s Justice Project is the national resource center on civil and criminal justice responses to intimate partner violence (IPV). BWJP promotes systemic change within the civil and criminal justice systems to ensure an effective and just response to victims and perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV), and the children exposed to this violence.

The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) serves as the National Indian Resource Center (NIRC) Addressing Domestic Violence and Safety for Indian Women and is the comprehensive T/TA provider to tribal domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions, providing training and technical assistance to tribal coalitions to increase knowledge of domestic violence and sexual assault and the specific implications for and needs of American Indian and Alaska Native women who are victimized; as well as educational opportunities which aim to broaden the coalitions’ expertise to provide training and community education for their tribal leaders and members. NIWRC seeks to enhance the capacity of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes, Native Hawaiians, and Tribal and Native Hawaiian organizations to respond to domestic violence.

The Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), a component of the U.S. Department of Justice, has as its mission the provision of federal leadership in developing the national capacity to reduce violence against women and the administration of justice for and strengthening of services to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

Praxis International works toward the elimination of violence in the lives of women and their children, primarily through analyzing and changing institutional practices that contribute to men’s violence toward women and methods of social control that make women vulnerable to violence. Projects include the Advocacy Learning Center; the Blueprint for Safety; Institutional Analysis/Community Assessment; and the Rural Advocacy project.

Red Wind Consulting works to strengthen Tribal programs and Native organizations’ ability to develop and enhance local responses to domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and sex trafficking through training and tribal technical assistance. Programs include Haseya Advocate Program,  the National Tribal Advocate Center, and the OVW Tribal TA Program serving tribal transitional housing and children and youth program grantees.

Southwest Center for Law & Policy (SWCLAP) provides legal training and technical assistance to tribal communities and to organizations and agencies serving Native people. SWCLAP is the host of the National Tribal Trial College providing free legal training for attorneys, judges, law enforcement, advocates and community members on violence against Native women issues. Other projects include the National Indian Country Clearinghouse on Sexual Assault and SAFESTAR, a tribal community sexual assault services training program.

Tribal Law & Policy Institute (TLPI) provides free publication resources, comprehensive training, and technical assistance for Native nations and tribal justice systems in order to empower Native communities to create and control their own institutions for the benefit of all community members, now, and for future generations. TLPI projects include the Tribal Court Clearinghouse, Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts Project, and the 2013 VAWA Enhanced Jurisdiction Project.

 

MSH-TA is supported by grant no. 2015-TA-AX-K028 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in the publications/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

 
 

Partners

Battered Women’s Justice Project is the national resource center on civil and criminal justice responses to intimate partner violence (IPV). BWJP promotes systemic change within the civil and criminal justice systems to ensure an effective and just response to victims and perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV), and the children exposed to this violence.

The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) serves as the National Indian Resource Center (NIRC) Addressing Domestic Violence and Safety for Indian Women and is the comprehensive T/TA provider to tribal domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions, providing training and technical assistance to tribal coalitions to increase knowledge of domestic violence and sexual assault and the specific implications for and needs of American Indian and Alaska Native women who are victimized; as well as educational opportunities which aim to broaden the coalitions’ expertise to provide training and community education for their tribal leaders and members. NIWRC seeks to enhance the capacity of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes, Native Hawaiians, and Tribal and Native Hawaiian organizations to respond to domestic violence.

The Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), a component of the U.S. Department of Justice, has as its mission the provision of federal leadership in developing the national capacity to reduce violence against women and the administration of justice for and strengthening of services to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

Praxis International works toward the elimination of violence in the lives of women and their children, primarily through analyzing and changing institutional practices that contribute to men’s violence toward women and methods of social control that make women vulnerable to violence. Projects include the Advocacy Learning Center; the Blueprint for Safety; Institutional Analysis/Community Assessment; and the Rural Advocacy project.

Red Wind Consulting works to strengthen Tribal programs and Native organizations’ ability to develop and enhance local responses to domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking and sex trafficking through training and tribal technical assistance. Programs include Haseya Advocate Program,  the National Tribal Advocate Center, and the OVW Tribal TA Program serving tribal transitional housing and children and youth program grantees.

Southwest Center for Law & Policy (SWCLAP) provides legal training and technical assistance to tribal communities and to organizations and agencies serving Native people. SWCLAP is the host of the National Tribal Trial College providing free legal training for attorneys, judges, law enforcement, advocates and community members on violence against Native women issues. Other projects include the National Indian Country Clearinghouse on Sexual Assault and SAFESTAR, a tribal community sexual assault services training program.

Tribal Law & Policy Institute (TLPI) provides free publication resources, comprehensive training, and technical assistance for Native nations and tribal justice systems in order to empower Native communities to create and control their own institutions for the benefit of all community members, now, and for future generations. TLPI projects include the Tribal Court Clearinghouse, Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts Project, and the 2013 VAWA Enhanced Jurisdiction Project.

 

MSH-TA is supported by grant no. 2015-TA-AX-K028 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in the publications/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

 
 

Working to End Violence Against Native American Women

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