News and Announcements


MAY 30, 2017

Bureau of Justice Statistics | Office of Justice Programs | U.S. Department of Justice:

Police Response to Domestic Violence, 2006-2015 (NCJ 250231) is now available on BJS.gov. This report presents 2006-15 data on:

  • Nonfatal domestic violence victimizations reported to police
  • Police response to these victimizations
  • Prevalence of related arrests or charges
  • Criminal complaints signed against the offender.

Domestic violence includes serious violence (rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault) and simple assaults committed by intimate partners (spouse, former spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend), immediate family members (parent, child, or sibling), or other relatives. Data are from the National Crime Victimization Survey, which obtained victims’ descriptions of police actions during their initial response to a reported crime and any follow-up contact with the victim.

Download the Full Report

Download the Summary

 


MAY 22, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Funding Opportunity: Family Violence Prevention and Services/Domestic Violence Shelter and Supportive Services/Grants to Native American Tribes (including Alaska Native Villages) and Tribal Organizations. HHS-2017-ACF-ACYF-FVPS-1211.

Announcement Link: https://ami.grantsolutions.gov/HHS-2017-ACF-ACYF-FVPS-1211

Solicitation Link: https://ami.grantsolutions.gov/files/HHS-2017-ACF-ACYF-FVPS-1211_0.pdf

Summary

Funding Opportunity Title: Family Violence Prevention and Services/Domestic Violence Shelter and Supportive Services/Grants to Native American Tribes (including Alaska Native Villages) and Tribal Organizations
Funding Opportunity Number: HHS-2017-ACF-ACYF-FVPS-1211
Program Office: Family and Youth Services Bureau
Funding Type: Mandatory
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Announcement Type: Initial
CFDA: 93.671
Post Date: 05/22/2017
Application Due Date: 07/10/2017
Description: This announcement governs the proposed award of formula grants under the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) to Native American Tribes (including Alaska Native Villages) and Tribal organizations. The purpose of these grants is to assist Tribes in efforts to increase public awareness about, and primary and secondary prevention of, family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence, and to provide immediate shelter and supportive services for victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their dependents.  Grantees are to be mindful that although the expenditure period for grants is a two-year period, an application is required each year to provide continuity in the provision of services.


APRIL 11, 2017

The U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women has announced that the 2016 Annual Tribal Consultation on Violence Against Alaska Native and American Indian Women Report is now available.

Click to view and download the Cover Letter and the 2016 Annual Consultation Report.


MARCH 7, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact Mallory Black: media@strongheartshelpline.org

StrongHearts Native Helpline Launches as a Critical Resource for Domestic Violence and Dating Violence in Tribal Communities

For the first time in history, a culturally-relevant, safe and confidential resource is available for Native American survivors of domestic violence and dating violence, who now make up more than 84 percent of the entire U.S. Native population. The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) and The Hotline have launched the first, national crisis line dedicated to serving tribal communities affected by violence across the U.S., called the StrongHearts Native Helpline.

Starting today, Native survivors in Kansas, Oklahoma and Nebraska – the helpline’s initial service areas — will be able to connect at no cost, one-on-one, with knowledgeable StrongHearts advocates who will provide support, assist with safety planning and connect them with resources based on their specific tribal affiliation, community location and culture. Callers outside of these states can still call StrongHearts while the helpline continues to develop its services network. All services available through the helpline are confidential and available by dialing 1-844-7NATIVE (1-844-762-8483) Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. CST. Callers after hours will have the option to connect with the National Domestic Violence Hotline or to call back the next business day.

“The reality is that so many of our American Indian and Alaska Native people experience domestic violence and dating violence every day,” said Lucy Rain Simpson, executive director of NIWRC and a citizen of Navajo Nation. “It has never been more evident that our Native people need a Native helpline to support efforts to restore power and safety in our tribal communities. The StrongHearts Native Helpline is ready to answer that call.”

The StrongHearts Native Helpline was created by and for Native Americans who, compared to all other races in the U.S., are twice as likely to experience rape or sexual assault, two and a half times more likely to experience violent crimes and five times more likely to be victims of homicide in their lifetimes. Even though a staggering four in five experience violence, Native Americans have historically lacked access to services.

“The Hotline has served victims and survivors of domestic violence for 20 years, and we recognize that Native American survivors have uniquely complex needs,” said Katie Ray-Jones, CEO of The Hotline. “Through StrongHearts, domestic violence advocates will be able to address those complex needs with an unparalleled level of specificity.”

Advocates at the StrongHearts Native Helpline are trained to navigate each caller’s abuse situation with a strong understanding of Native cultures, as well as issues of tribal sovereignty and law, in a safe and accepting environment, free of assumption and judgment. Callers will be treated with dignity, compassion, and respect by a well-trained professional.

“To enhance access to services and meet the unique needs of Native survivors, a dedicated Native helpline that provides support and connections to shelter, advocacy, and other services is critical,” states Marylouise Kelley, FVPSA Program Division Director.

Initially, StrongHearts will focus efforts on providing services to survivors who live in Kansas, Nebraska and Oklahoma, which combined make up more than 12.5 percent of the country’s entire Native American population.

“The team will leverage the large number of Native-centered resources established within these states to begin providing services, with further outreach to tribal communities as StrongHearts continues to grow,” said Simpson.

The StrongHearts Native Helpline plans to purposefully and thoughtfully expand its services to Native American survivors nationwide – based on utilization, demand and resources available.

“Verizon is proud to be the first corporate sponsor of the StrongHearts Native Helpline, a resource that will provide a crucial space for Native people to find support,” said Stuart Conklin, program manager at the Verizon Foundation. “We look forward to its success and continuing to build on a lasting partnership.”

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MSH-TA is supported by Grant No. 2015-TA-AX-K028, awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in the publications/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

 
 

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